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Cystic Fibrosis Questions - PORT
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PORT
Oct 01, 2013 at 9:44 AM
Hi! I am new to cysticLife. My daughter is 13. She is inpatient right now and they were unable to put in a PICC and had to do a Central Line (her 2nd central line). They have told us that her next admission if a PICC won't work they will do a PORT. So we need to make a plan and try to figure out where to put it. Where are the "normal locations"? Does anyone have it in the center of the chest either upper or middle? My daughter does Karate which will be an issue and LOVES roller coasters so she doesn't want the port were it will interfere with the protective straps of the coasters. Also she is wondering how kids think it feels, what is good about the , what is bad. We would like honest opinions and info. Any restrictions other than no direct hits to the port area?

Thanks for any info you can give me!
Answers
I've always had a problem with PICC lines. My last one (over 3 years ago) took them 2 hours to get placed while I was fully sedated. I got my port after that. Mine is on the right side of my chest, just beneath the collar bone. I also love roller coasters, and as long as I don't have the port accessed, it's not a problem with the straps of the ride- even upside down ones ;) They are so much easier than PICCS though. After having it placed, any time they need to do a blood draw or IV's, then it's just one poke to have it accessed, no digging around trying to find a vein, etc. The drawback is that it has to be accessed once a month to have it flushed out with saline and heparin so that it doesn't get clotted up.
Oct 09, 2013 at 3:59 AM
I have tiny veins so PICCs were a nightmare for me. I love my port! Its on my right side at the top of my boob. I was just on a roller coaster and didn't notice a thing so that should be fine as long as its healed. I would never get one in the center of my chest, it would be visible all the time. When its on the side its easily covered by clothing.
Oct 07, 2013 at 10:14 AM
My port is in my upper right chest also. I was just on roller coasters, so that won't be an issue as long as you allow it heal properly. As Tiffa said, ports ARE easier... as long as you take care of them. Good Luck, I think you'll like the port.
Oct 01, 2013 at 9:55 PM
All of my ports have been in my upper right chest. I lift weights and run, and I haven't had any issues with my port.

With a port, you will have to access it and flush it with saline and heparin once a month. If you don't do this, it will clot and need to be removed. I learned this the hard way :).

Ports are good if you are hospitalized more than twice a year or if you are unable to get a PICC. They're easy to deal with, and it makes hospitalizations easier.

The options for location are: arm, chest, rib area, or thigh.

Roller coasters won't be an issue. I would say if she is accessed and on medications, maybe the straps could rub against the access site, but other than that she will be able to do everything she is already doing. I don't see Karate being an issue, but obviously she doesn't want anybody doing a roundhouse kick into wherever she has it put. She may need to take some caution there, but you'll be amazed at how easy ports are to disguise, protect, and handle!
Oct 01, 2013 at 12:07 PM
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